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I just ran across this New York Times book review by Michael Pollan from February, 2018:I
HIPPIE FOOD 
How Back-to-the-Landers, Longhairs, and Revolutionaries Changed the Way We Eat
By Jonathan Kauffman
344 pp. William Morrow. $26.99.
"For a revolution that supposedly failed, the counterculture of the 1960s and early 1970s scored a string of enduring victories. Environmentalism, feminism, civil and gay rights, as well as styles of music, fashion, politics, therapy and intoxication: In more ways than many of us realize, we live in a world created by the ’60s. (Though, as our politics regularly attest, some of us are rather less pleased to be living in that world than others.) Jonathan Kauffman’s briskly entertaining history, 'Hippie Food,' makes a convincing case for adding yet another legacy to that list: the way we eat.
Kauffman has more in mind than the menu items that the ’60s served up: the tofu, tempeh and tamari, the granola and yogurt, the nut loafs and avocado sandwiches on whole wheat bread with their poufs of alfalfa sprouts…hard as it is to imagine now, all of these foods were radical novelties before 1970 or so. But the counterculture transformed much more than the American menu; it also changed the way we grow our food and how we think about purchasing and consuming it. 'Eating brown rice was a political act' …"

Camping With Roof Top Tents

This set up was in the Mattole river campgrounds the night before I left on my Lost Coast hike.The couple had just bought it from Tepui Tents of Santa Cruz, California. I used a tent like this for about 10 years in Baja California and it was great.No need to scramble into the back of a pick up truck to sleep. It folds up into a compact, fairly aerodynamic shape on the roof and in the desert, you don't have to worry about snakes or scorpions.The ladder acts as a cantilevered support for the foldout section, and the mattress and bedding and pillow are inside so that after unfolding it, you just climb in and go to sleep.
I had it mounted on a 4 x 4 Toyota Tacoma and would 4-wheel it to an isolated beach (where there was surf), and face the screened opening towards the ocean.
The different models run from about $1,000 to $2500.

Garden in summer abundance; raspberries lower left, booming after being cut to ground. Potatoes middle right in raised bed; tomatoes in hoop greenhouse.

Driftwood Shack at Navarro Beach, Mendocino County

One of the new photos that will go in the revised and expanded version of Driftwood Shacks: Anonymous Architecture Along the California Coast. I'm working on layout right now. Lots of new photos from my trip to The Lost Coast and environs a few weeks ago.

United States Finally Gets Serious About Wind Power

From the New York Times, May 23, 2018
By Stanley Reed and Ivan Penn
"…Massachusetts is looking to capitalize on wind technology, and aims to add 1,600 megawatts of electricity by 2027. That would be enough to power a third of all residential homes in the state.
On Wednesday, that effort took a major step forward as the State of Massachusetts, after holding an auction, selected a group made up of a Danish investment firm and a Spanish utility to erect giant turbines on the ocean bottom, beginning about 15 miles off Martha’s Vineyard. This initial project will generate 800 megawatts of electricity, roughly enough to power a half a million homes. At the same time, Rhode Island announced it would award a 400-megawatt offshore wind project to another bidder in the auction.
The groups must now work out the details of their contracts with the states’ utilities.
'We see this not just as a project but as the beginning of an industry,' Lars Thaaning Pedersen, the chief executive of Vineyard Wind, which was awarded the Massachusetts contract, said in an interview.
Offshore wind farms have increasingly become mainstream sources of power in Northern Europe, and are fast becoming among the cheapest sources of electricity in countries like Britain and Germany. Those power sources in those two countries already account for more than 12 gigawatts of electricity generation capacity.
But the United States has largely not followed that lead, with just one relatively small offshore wind farm built off the coast of Rhode Island. Currently, the entire country’s offshore wind capacity is just 30 megawatts.
'We know in light of Northern Europe’s experience with offshore wind that many U.S. ports will benefit from the arrival of the industry here,' Jon Mitchell, the New Bedford mayor, said.from offshore operators. 'As long as there are boats that will be here,' he said, 'it is business for us.'…"
Full article: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/05/23/business/energy-environment/offshore-wind-massachusetts.html

The Lost Coast - More Photos #6

This log must have been 100 Feet long. Most of the logs on these beaches are redwood. They'd be worth a fortune, but there's no way to retrieved them. On beaches with more access, to the south, you don't find much redwood.

Tiny Home With Dormer in Humboldt County

Funky, but it shows an interesting variation: a dormer that would make the otherwise claustrophobic loft feel more spacious. I don't remember seeing this on any of the typical steep-gabled tiny homes. Also, note the shakes for rain protection over the door.

The Lost Coast - More Photos #4

North of Buck Creek. The trail on bluff coming back down to beach. About a 7-foot down. I tossed my hiking poles and then backpack down, then jumped.

The Lost Coast - More Photos #3

"Many rivers to cross…" (I hear Jimmy Cliff when I think of this phrase.)
This was at Horse Mountain Creek. Note hiking shoes tied to back pack, so I had both hands free for my walking sticks, carefully barefooting it across.
Do I wish I'd had trekking poles! 95% of the hikers I met had them. They would have made the trip a ton easier. I don't want them on good trails, but on sketchy terrain, they're immensely useful.
This (the third) day, I was on a roll. Back from the dead.
I left Reneé and Pica a note on the sand, since they were coming along behind me.

The Lost Coast - More Photos #2

Mr. Casual, among the flock of sea lions on the sandy beach at the (abandoned) Punta Gorda lighthouse

The Lost Coast - More Photos #1

Photo: south of Buck Creek, trails like this up above the beach were such a delight.
Yesterday I stopped and walked on Stinson Beach on the way home from the city. Boy, was it easy. No creeks to ford, no rocks to hop, no deep sand to slog through. Piece of cake.
I realized what a life-changing experience the Lost Coast trip has been. For one thing, beaches for me will be forever different. Like I went into the heart of all beaches, and will appreciate and love them with more depth from ever on.
Also, pushing through when I was about to give up. "If it doesn't kill you, it's good for you."
What doesn't show up in any of my photos are the 1500-foot high cliffs hovering over a lot of this coast, awe-inspiring, but scary. Some big gashes in the cliff where there'd been slides, with whole trees uprooted. Raw.
On YouTube right now: Wilson Pickett: "Land of a Thousand Dances"

Day Three on Lost Coast

Left: Big Creek, which hiker had tight-rope-crossed (on log) the night before
Set out at 8 AM after breakfast of granola with hot water and my last hard boiled egg. Had to cross creek and I wasn't about to try balancing on slippery log with heavy pack. My technique: take off shoes, tie laces together, hang around neck, go barefoot across creek with my 2 bespoke driftwood hiking poles, v. carefully; slipping would be a disaster. Got across, dried feet, rebooted, was on my way.

Felt great, it was lucky that the fast-moving hiker the night before had told me how to get up on bluff trail; otherwise would not have seen it and struggled through beach boulders and deep sand. Whoo! Walking on a trail was a cinch, and this one was lined with flowers. Fortified with almonds, chocolate, and 14-grams-of-protein power bar, numerous water stops, I made it through the 2nd high tide zone,. What I learned to do was rest before flat-lining. I stopped for 15 or so minutes, 4-5 times, resting near a creek and once, lying in the shade in a driftwood shack, to regain strength and then pushed on. I ended up walking for 8-1/2 hours until pretty near exhausted, reached Shelter Cove around 5 PM.


At end of trip. Note driftwood trekking poles.
I'll post more pics in next few days.

Really nice #Japanese style home on Lost Coast. There’s a landing strip here and surf spot. Have no idea how they got building materials in. #surfers dream.

Lost Coast Backpack Trip Continued

There are 2 stretches of coast, each 3-4 miles long that are "inaccessible at high tide." You are warned that you can die if get caught there. Well, uh, OK.
To begin with, it was harder going than I thought. My pack was really heavy. There was a rock slide upon entering the first part of the northern no-fly high tide zone that had to be clambered over. I hadn't brought rain gear, either for me or the backpack, because the weather report had said no rain…well, 20% chance of rain the first day…and it started raining. Shit, if it poured I'd be screwed.
I found an opening in the rocks and prepared to duck under when the raindrops stopped. Yo!
Onward, or…upward. I had a moment climbing over the rock slide; I slipped, almost fell backward,and got a shot of adrenaline. I occurred to me if I fell and got hurt, I'd be screwed. No way to get word to the outside world. What had I got myself into? And yeah, grudgingly, being 80+ has taken its toll in strength and agility. In my mind I'm still 18, but that just ain't the reality with an aging body. The kids that passed me that day seemed so strong and bouncy. God, I used to be like that.
I was a bit spooked, got to the end of the tidal zone and felt too tired to make it around the final point.
I found a ledge above the water, pitched my tent on the rocky ground, hoping I'd be above the high tide that night (I was), spent a restless night. Had to wait a few hours in the morning for the tide to drop so I could get around the point. 5-1/2 hours hiking the 1st day.
After about 3 hours the 2nd day, I basically flat-lined. I was depressed, wiped out, thinking of all the things that could go wrong.
The wind was blowing, sun glaring, I felt almost dizzy, so stopped at Big Creek, a wide canyon with 15'-wide creek, pitched my tent, which took 45 minutes in howling wind, climbed inside and slept for an hour.
When I woke up, two women from Auburn, maybe in their 40s, had pitched their tents 100' away and we visited. Renee told me she'd had 10 herniated discs, a back operation, and several pieces of titanium implanted and that it had taken her 10 years to recover, and one leg was shorter than the other. And here she was, on this incredibly tough hike. Shit, what kind of wimp was I? This was inspiration.
That night we sat around their campfire and her pal Pica pulled out a plastic lightweight ukulele and sang songs in a quiet sweet voice. Did I play the ukulele. Well, uh yeah-uh, songs from the '20s, and  I played "Five Foot Two," "Ain't She Sweet," and "Jada." Fun.
I got several hours of good sleep that night, woke up. I'm gonna make it! I lightened my load by burying a pair of running shoes, some extra food, and a spiral notebook in the sand and set off feeling lighter and inspired the next morning.
It's Saturday morning, I'm at Trinks in Gualala, with a double latte and piece of berry pie with whipped cream for pre-breakfast, now going to get bacon and eggs. I can't get enpough food after the trip; listeninng to the Georgia Satellites sing "Keep Your Hands To Yourself: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AMFMf9cN64U
Rock and roll!

The Lost Coast Beach Walk


Just back, now in Gualala. Exhausted. 25 miles of hiking in soft sand and boulder-hopping and high-tide dodging. It was the adventure of my life. On the 2nd day, wasn't sure I'd make it, but got a rest and pushed through for 8-1/2 hours yesterday. Utterly wild, raw, tough terrain. If something goes wrong out there, there's now way to get help. I'm so proud.
Had steak, 2 pints IPA at the just-opened brewery in Shelter Cove last night to celebrate, the Big Boy breakfast this morning in Trink's, my body restocking on depleted reserves; boy is it great to be ravenous and burning up whatever food is consumed.
Shot pics of lots of beach shacks.
Sea lions were unexpected maybe 75 of them snoozing on the sand near the abandoned Punta Gorda lighthouse, hardly mindful of humanoid in their midst.
Will write more soon…