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Reconditioned McCormick Farmall Cub Tractor

These tractors were made, basically unchanged in design, from 1947-1964. They pulled 12' bottom plows. They were versatile and used on smaller-scale farms.

In Pt. Reyes Station

Doug Macleod — "Chill on Cold" (Blues)

Our Next Book - SMALL HOMES - Now In Production

I started 3 days ago. My M.O. is to open the file drawer and start picking out folders (there are 50-60 now) to work on.

I pick them out randomly and start doing layout— with scissors and removable scotch tape. No stinkin computers at this stage.

I print out the text in 3 & 4 columns, adjust photos to desired size on copy machine, and do rough layouts.

This is turning out to be really fun. We've accumulated material for maybe a year and now, the book is starting to assemble itself, in random manner. Organizing will come later.

Note: contact us if you know of small homes (400-1200 sq. ft.) that would work in this book:
smallhomes@shelterpub.com

We are especially interested in any kind of homes in cities and towns.


The man who grows fields full of tables and chairs

"At first glance it is a typical countryside scene. Deep in the Derbyshire Dales, young willow trees stretch upwards towards the late spring sun. Birds, bees and the odd wasp provide a gentle soundtrack to the bucolic harmony.
But laid out in neat rows in the middle of a field are what appears to be a rather peculiar crop.
On closer inspection these are actually upside-down chairs, fully rooted in the sandy soil.
Slender willows sprout out of the ground then after a few inches the trunk becomes the back of a chair, the seat follows and finally the legs. The structure is tied to a blue frame and the entire form is clothed in leaves.…"
http://www.bbc.com/news/business-32977012
Sent by Jonathan Greene

Building a Primitive Wattle and Daub Hut From Scratch


"I built this hut in the bush using naturally occurring materials and primitive tools. The hut is 2m wide and 2m long, the side walls are 1m high and the ridge line (highest point) is 2m high giving a roof angle of 45 degrees. A bed was built inside and it takes up a little less than half the hut. The tools used were a stone hand axe to chop wood, fire sticks to make fire, a digging stick for digging and clay pots to carry water. The materials used in the hut were wood for the frame, vine and lawyer cane for lashings and mud for daubing. Broad leaves were initially used as thatch which worked well for about four months before starting to rot. The roof was then covered with sheets of paper bark which proved to be a better roofing material. An external fireplace and chimney were also built to reduce smoke inside. The hut is a small yet comfortable shelter and provides room to store tools and materials out of the weather.…"
Sent by Jon Kalish

Four-Year Old Readers of Our Books

 It's surprising how many little kids love our mini books. This is Oliver. He and his family came to my book signing at the Mother Earth News Fair in Oregon last week. He went through it page by page.