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Killer Beamer Motorcycle

On the street in Point Reyes Station California a few days ago. Yeah!

1 comment :

Anonymous said...

Lloyd
wonder what your thoughts on this are?

Makes a Good Point.

Maybe the Obligation of the Foolhardy to Rescue Volunteers Should be More Known?

http://www.vancouversun.com/opinion/columnists/Pete+McMartin+much+saved+life+worth/10762288/story.html?google_editors_picks=true


How much is a saved life worth?


Grateful families should offer more than thanks to search-and-rescue teams, which rely on donations

By Pete McMartin, Vancouver Sun columnist
- See more at: http://www.vancouversun.com/opinion/columnists/Pete+McMartin+much+saved+life+worth/10762288/story.html?google_editors_picks=true#sthash.MjJTJode.dpuf

The cost of search-and-rescue teams at resorts such as Whistler Blackcomb is underwriten by the volunteer rescuers themselves, who work without pay.

People, however, are less inclined toward the foolhardy and the recklessly unprepared — which, by the sounds of it, Abrahamsen could be accused of.She skied out of bounds (whether on purpose or by accident is still unclear, though one report stated she followed a group of skiers out of bounds). She had only been in Whistler since late December. She lacked extra food and survival supplies. She did not stay put, as search-and-rescue experts are constantly exhorting skiers and hikers to do, but tried to walk out. Several times, she crossed a glacier-fed creek.And three days passed before one of her housemates felt discomfited enough by her absence to contact the local RCMP. When they finally were contacted, this is what happened:


The actual backcountry search was delegated, as usual, to the Whistler and Blackcomb search-and-rescue teams. Those members have regular jobs, of course, and the time they devote to search-and-rescue operations costs them income. For example, Brad Sills, the team’s senior manager, is president of the Callaghan Country Wilderness Adventures Ltd., and runs a lodge and ski-tour operation in the Callaghan Valley. Other than the costs of a per diem for meals, gas mileage and a command vehicle, which are funded by the government, the members of the search and rescue team do not get paid for their efforts. Everything else, Sills said, is self-funded.

Other expenses incurred during the search?An ambulance was put on standby. A helicopter had to be chartered for three hours, at a cost, Sills said, “somewhere north of $2,000 per hour.” When Abrahamsen was finally extricated from the backcountry, she was examined by medical staff at a local clinic. And, oh yes, she asked for a ham-and-cheese submarine sandwich because she was famished. I could not determine if she paid for it or not. (I joke. Sort of.)

Should Abrahamsen be billed for the cost of her search and rescue?

The Whistler Search and Rescue team does accept donations, however. Sills said the largest the team received was $10,000 from a Japanese family for their daughter’s rescue.To me, that’s a bargain.

And to Abrahamsen’s family, I would say, the Whistler search and rescue team got your daughter back to you, free of charge, and at some risk to themselves.I don’t know that family’s financial circumstances, or if they have made a donation already, but if they haven’t they should.pmcmartin@vancouversun.com

I believe, that the family should not only make donation to the Whistler Search and Rescue, but do a massive fundraising for Whistler (Volunteer) Search and Rescue. They not only got their daughter back, she is well.

http://www.vancouversun.com/opinion/columnists/Pete+McMartin+much+saved+life+worth/10762288/story.html?google_editors_picks=true

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