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Salmon!

These guys killed it yesterday. Louie says there's the expression, "We're in 'em," meaning everything's working, like we're in the (school of) salmon. They had over 20 of these beauties, 22-25 pounds each, at $8/lb, it's $160-200 per fish.

Old Willys Truck

Discovered this beauty earlier this morning. In the foggy mist…

Louie's Shop

About 7:30 AM this morning. Got here last night

Movin' On

I love doing this blog. For the past few years, I've done at least a post per day. But I've reached a new stage now, with a body of work to do, so I'm no longer going to do daily posts, 365. I'll be putting things up here, but less frequently. I'm also going to quit checking email daily. I need less electronics in my life.
Here are my upcoming projects:
The Shelter Blog I'm going to put some major effort into it. It's now up and running, and I have a lot of articles I want to do for builders (Round Barns of Oregon, Master Builders of the Middle Ages, Aisle-and-bay-divided Timber Frame Barns, SunRay Kelley's Latest Cob Yurts…). The goal is to have this blog be as good as one of our books. (Check it out in 6 months.)
YouTube Videos 1-1/2 minute videos on each of our building books, Tools for the Half-Acre Homestead, Office Workout Equipment, Building a raised garden bed, splitting shakes, washing dishes…
Stretching - the Pocketbook This book has sold over 3 million copies and now we are doing it as a pocketbook.
Book on Barns
Book on Small Homes
Sheesh, until I started writing this, I didn't realize how much great stuff there is to do!
Actually, will be posting in the next few days, as I'm on the road, up at my friend Louie's in the NorCal woods.

Jeff Dean, Woodworker

Jeff Dean sent us some photos and links to his buildings and unique joinery. See his buildings here, and  the photos of his work and links he sent us on The Shelter Blog here.

"Our Little Dream House"

This tiny home in British Columbia generated a lot of interest on The Shelter Blog here.

Mockingbird by Charlie & Inez Foxx

Carly Simon and James Taylor did a good version of this song, but here's the real thing. It's all too often that the original dynamite song is almost unknown.

Who's ever heard of Charlie and Inez Foxx?  What singing! A great CD by them is titled "Mockingbird."
Mocking Bird by Inez & Charlie Foxx on Grooveshark

Salmon, Stripers, Halibut

There are fish everywhere this week. Two friends have brought us salmon (had some for dinner, and now smoking and making gravlax with the rest of it), and someone gave us this striped bass. I forgot how striking (sic) they are. Stripes. Gonna smoke this as well.

Musical Events in Round Barn in Iowa


BCKRVUE has left a new comment on your post "Curved Roof Barn in Oregon/The Largest Bookstore i...":

Hi Lloyd this site combines two thing you appreciate, Music & Architecture. Enjoy! 

http://www.codfishhollowbarnstormers.com/about-us.html

TV Series Seeks Off-the-grid Homes

We have been contacted by the producer of a TV series on off-grid homes. They are looking for people who have recently started living off the grid. If you're in this category, send us the story of why you moved off the grid, along with some photos of the home, and of you and your family. Email to: shelter@shelterpub.com.

Heavy Equipment in Oregon

Not sure what its function is, but it's sure heavy duty. Somehow used in logging I presume. Note how they have used chained treads around tires to create Caterpillar-like tractor treads.

4-Minute Exercise-Stretch To Do at Your Computer

A free example of "Foundation Training" by Corey Goodman. In the intro, he says that this is "…good for anyone with a lingering back injury, an older body, or if you've used yourself more than others have."

I can sure relate to those last two.

I think Corey has got something very good here, and with his book and videos.

Posture!

http://www.foundationtraining.com/videos_and_blog/free-foundation-training-with-dr-eric-goodman-master-the-basics-of-movement/

Water Skeeters, Mountain Lion, Coyote, American White Pelicans, Clams, Seaweed

Intersections with the natural world the past few days: I studied water skeeters in a hill pond Tuesday; a brilliant design by mother nature. They float on 6 legs; 4 long ones for skittering and 2 short legs in front. They move mostly with breaststrokes of the 2 front legs and when startled just zoom. I was transfixed, watched them for 5 minutes or so, the fact they float on their legs…Doug saw a young mountain lion; we always look for the long tail to be sure it's not a big bobcat…Yes, a long tail, he said, also that it appeared to be a young one, with spots on its skin…I saw a big healthy coyote crossing the road Tuesday night…Yesterday I paddled my kayak across the bay and dug clams…saw 4 of the huge American Pelicans; wingspan of 8-10 feet…harvested some seaweed -- Macrocystis integrifolia, a smaller cousin of giant kelp; I've been bringing home all kinds of seaweed and this one appears promising. It's flavorful, with salt crystals that sparkle when it's dried. I'm grinding it and using it instead of salt on meat, vegetables. salad.

Summertime by The Zombies on Grooveshark

"Tiny Homes on the Move is a Glorious Romp" (Book Review on Treehugger


Great review of Tiny Homes on the Move on Treehugger by Lloyd Alter:

"This book is everything that TreeHugger tries not to be, and it is just totally captivating. Since its inception, TreeHugger has been "partial to a modern aesthetic." As an architect, I am even more so, and the tiny houses, RVs and trailers shown on TreeHugger have tended to lean toward the sleek and modern. This is certainly the first time a hippied up VW van has graced the pages here. …"

Check out the full review here: http://www.treehugger.com/tiny-houses/tiny-homes-move-glorious-rom-book-review.html

Nice Apartment Building in San Francisco

This building just has it. I like the color, the curved Queen Anne windows, the building's proportions, the black and white window details, especially the dot-dot-dot ornamentation just under the eaves. Now here's some architecture!

The paint is peeling; somehow it looks homey. Thankfully it hasn't been given the over-the-top clueless paint job of so many SF Victorians.

.

Foxy

Maybe 15 years ago we had a fox that would appear when we were barbecuing. We'd give him little pieces of meat -- not a lot, we didn't want him to get dependent on humanoids. He was very cautious, always ready to flee. He was a joy to see, to get so close to an elegant wild creature. But there was a period where all the mid-sized critters -- foxes, skunks, raccoons, possums -- died off from distemper or something. Now they're coming back.

This little guy has been skirting our half-acre the past few weeks -- looks like a juvenile. A few days ago he was on my woodpile. I was about 20 feet away, standing stock still and we locked eyes. He craned his head in and out, I guess getting multiple takes on me.

Yesterday he nestled into a hollow spot on the (living) roof of the chicken coop.

Also on the wild creature front: in the last week I've caught 2 hummingbirds. They fly into the office kitchen and can't get out. It's easy to catch them. Once they're in my cupped hands, they seem to relax. I'll always find someone around to see when I release them. When I open my hands, they sit there a split second, green feathers shimmering in the sunlight. Then vooom! Off like a little helicopter.

Giving away 'Genius of Japanese Carpentry' book for free

Hey Lloyd:

Just thought your readers might like to know... we are giving away a copy of The Genius of Japanese Carpentry for free. It's an excellent book... extremely awe-inspiring to see the images and drawings of some recent traditional temple renovation and construction in Japan. Mind-boggling timber framing and attention to detail. The title says it all. They don't mess around.

www.theyearofmud.com/2014/08/05/genius-of-japanese-carpentry
- ziggy

Brian 'Ziggy' Liloia - Natural Building Workshops & more at The Year of Mud:  http://www.theyearofmud.com

Two Barns With Gambrel Roofs in Oregon's Willamette Valley


This post is for builders
These two barns were very close together. You find this all over the country (world): each micro-locale will have its own style barn. The farmers/builders would look around at standing barns, "Say that looks pretty good…"

With a gambrel, you take a gable roof and pop it up in the middle, creating more headroom (hay room).

A nice touch with the red barn is the dormer roof following the slant of the top slope. Also the arrow-straight eaves, no sags: good foundation. The ridge vents on the white barn also nice.

If you focus on a barn, you can feel the builder. A brotherhood, sure enough.

Tiny House Fair in Texas in October

Movers and shakers of the tiny house community, including Jay Shafer and Deek Diedricksen, will convene at the campus of Tiny Texas Houses on October 10-12 to discuss many aspects of the subject. It's about 45 minutes south of Austin. I'll be there doing a presentation on Tiny Homes on the Move. Info here.

Go to the post page…



Burger and Big Mama at Brownsville Saloon

Not sure what this store was. It was in Brownsville (Oregon), Friday evening, as I was heading north from Eugene. Had a great hamburger and dark oat stout at the Brownsville Saloon Bar & Grill and intense conversation with another music lover at the bar; someone was playing really good songs on the juke box, including Hound Dog by Big Mama Willie Mae Thornton.

I'm back home, trying to unscramble photos and notes. Taking off tomorrow to do an appearance at Bookshop Santa Cruz Tuesday night.

I've got about a dozen barns, which I'll post when I get time…

The Willamette Valley - Hey Hay!

I headed south from Portland Thursday about noon. I meandered down to Corvallis on side roads to the west of I-5, shooting pictures of barns, picking berries, enjoying the beauty of this valley. It is uber-agricultural. Rich soil, lots of water, 3 months of summer heat. It's hay harvest time and I saw more hay here in 2 days than I've seen in all my life.

Huge bales, way different from my hay-bucking days in Colusa, Calif. (2 guys, a flatbed truck, hay hooks). It's now a big machinery operation. Hay everywhere—just cut, or baled into huge rectangles or cylinders sitting in the fields.

This valley is on a more human scale than say, California's San Joaquin Valley (along Hwy 5), with its bizarre monocropping. It's a little like the fields in England, but on a larger scale.

Had standing room only at my event in Corvallis. Sending this from Portland airport -- on me way home. Got a number of really nice barns -- will post when time.