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Wonderful Morning/Blue Jay in the Office

There was something about yesterday morning. I don't know if it was wind dying down or phase of moon or planetary alignment or Spring rains making hills richly green, but it was exquisite. I'm not a fan of merely clear skies and warm sunshine (Isn't it a beautiful day? -- No it's not). But this was a California blue-sky, verdant green growth, good smelling fresh morning. Just a socks knocker-offer.
 
A blue jay — actually a California Scrub Jay — somehow got into the office and was knocking things over trying to escape and I caught him. He calmed down after a while and seemed copacetic in my hands. (I've practiced getting the right non-threatening grip with chickens; when you hold them gently and firmly, they relax.) Regarding me with an inquisitive eye — they're highly intelligent birds, members of the corvid family, as are crows and ravens. When my grandson Maceo returned from a walk with his mom, we let him go. He flew up to the roof, regarded us for a moment and then took off for his wild world.

3 comment s:

Anonymous said...

well, Lloyd, you really must be a Bird Whisperer..
first your exploits with Hummingbird Capture, and now this.

all I can say is, I am jealous. I do not have the knack.

my jays squawk at me to come out and feed them, but that is as close as I get.

Anonymous said...

I knew better, but based on my experience with Midwest Blue Jays, dive bombing my head over the years, when I read your headline, and saw the look on your face I thought the worse. I appologize. Glad you were able to help the little guy out.

Peace
Gill

Anonymous said...

could be changes to who/what is allowed to run backyard farm/garden operations.

http://www.policestateusa.com/2014/michigan-right-to-farm/

http://healthimpactnews.com/2014/michigan-residents-lose-right-to-farm-in-backyards/

MICHIGAN — Property rights took a hit this week when the Michigan Commission of Agriculture and Rural Development voted to to take away protections for backyard farmers statewide — which will result in many small farms being shut down.

Backyard and urban farms were previously protected by Michigan’s Right to Farm Act. The Act stated that local ordinances could not trump the state’s Generally Accepted Agriculture Management Practices (GAAMP). After the rule change, however, these protections no longer apply to many homeowners who keep small numbers of livestock.

Backyard farmers who raise their own chickens, goats, pigs, and honey may have to give up their operations and go back to shopping for mass produced meats at the supermarket.

Lands that are located within 1/8 mile proximity to 13 neighboring homes, or that are 250-feet away from just one neighboring home, will no longer receive protection of the Right to Farm Act. The regulatory mess is going to shut down many small farms completely, and leave many others with large sections of property that is prohibited for farm use.

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