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Sk8ing Again

For months I've been wistfully looking at the downhills, especially the newly-paved. Just couldn't risk a fall with shoulder healing. But things feel together enough for me to venture back on the pavement. So much fun!
  Since I've never learned to slide (whereby you can control yr. speed), I need to get off the board before getting to the speed where I can't get off and remain vertical. For now I'm just skating gentle slopes and carving. No (well not much) bombing.
   I wear Loaded gloves with hockey pucks velcroed to the palms. Cliff Coleman, downhill speed legend, told me that when you fall, remember 4 words: "Get On Your Hands." Meaning get those hockey pucks sliding on the pavement so you're not sanding off skin. Also be on your knees, i.e. knee pads with hard surfaces, so you're on all fours, sliding on hockey pucks and knee pads. The one time I had the presence of mind to do this was in San Francisco late at night when my board hit an unsurmountable crack in the pavement, and I skidded along on 4 noncorporeal surfaces. Felt pretty good about that.
   Boards shown from my, ahem sponsors: at left my Santa Cruz (not sure of model)----for bombing and sharper turns, at right my Loaded Bhangra, which I ride most of the time for mellow downhills, smooth turns.

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

http://youtu.be/d2nnSzUqFLo
http://youtu.be/eHcKtN3lndg
http://youtu.be/PH9Ymf9bERY

Anonymous said...

Llyod, you are an inspiration. I took up long boarding at 53 based on your experience and a gentle nudge from a lovely lady I know. Had a few bumps along the way and anticipate more (a bit of a realist), however it is an incredible experience. I use the standard wrist guards for the hands and they seem to work ok. One thing, never let an engineer try and analyse if the lead foot on the board is correct, just go with your intuition (something engineers have problems with). Changed it up to see if there is a difference and .... damn right there is a difference, I ended up on my head. Moral of the story, go with what feels right and don't over analyse it.

Cheers

Bill

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