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Heidi's Tiny Cob House in Finland

"This is Heidi's cottage, 'Elaman Puu', which means Tree of Life. It's built with a variety of natural building techniques with a rubble trench, earthbag stem walls dressed in stone, birch bark damp-proof membrane beneath the straw bales on the northern walls with cob and cordwood to the south and a reciprocal roof on a roundwood frame. All of the materials were harvested locally. Heidi began her natural building journey by investigating what natural materials were available on the land where she wanted to build her tiny house. Set in the forests of southern Finland the choice of roundwood timbers with a reciprocal roof was easy and obvious. Heidi also dug several pits on the land to search out the clay she would later use to plaster the interior of the home.…"
From naturalhomes (a really nice website)

4 comments:

Dana said...

AWESOME!!! Size? Pics of the interior??

Anonymous said...

Hats off to Heidi! What an inspiration

tess said...

Wondrous.

Anonymous said...

Cob House

http://www.odditycentral.com/architecture/english-farmer-builds-incredible-hobbit-house-for-just-150-pounds.html

English Farmer Builds Incredible Hobbit House for Just 150 Pounds

The former art teacher drew plans for the house on the back of an envelope. He didn’t need any special planning permissions since it was classified as a summer home. Buck spent two years gathering natural and reclaimed materials for construction. It took him an additional eight months to construct it with his bare hands; he didn’t use any power tools at all.

For the 300 sq. ft. floor space, Buck rescued the floorboards from a neighbor’s unused skip. He retrieved the windscreen of an old lorry and converted the glass into windows. The walls are painted with a mixture of chalk and plant resin. The roof is a simple wooden frame thatched with straw from nearby fields.

A shallow well located few yards away from the front door serves as a natural fridge for preserving food. The house comes with a composting lavatory in a separate thatched outhouse with a view of the Oxfordshire countryside. A tin tub hangs on the wall outside for bathing

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