• Subscribe to
    Lloyd’s Blog via RSS.
Tumblr
  • Check out TheShelterBlog.com
  • Tools for the
    Half-Acre Homestead
 

Natural Building Colloquium - High Desert, Southern California Oct. 17th-22nd, 2016

"Focusing on the West Coast and South West
Quail Springs is an educational and land stewardship nonprofit organization dedicated to demonstrating and teaching holistic ways of designing human environments, restoring and revitalizing the land and community, and facilitating deeper understandings of ourselves and one another through immersive experiences in nature. The 2016 Colloquium organizing team consists of the whole Quail Springs team, Sasha Rabin*, Tammy Van, and Rebekah Hacker."

"The gathering will give focus and priority to the building and builders of the west coast and south west, US. ​ We ask that all people attending the colloquium have some experience with natural building. This is not the event for the novice builder. That being said, we value the fresh eyes and perspectives, and enthusiasm that comes with a newness to the field. We will strive for a balance of experienced attendees, while also encouraging the next generation of builders.…"
http://www.earthenshelter.com/colloquium.html

*Sasha's beautiful cob house will be in Small Homes.

Vermont Bus for Disabled Adults

This is a bus at Zeno Mountain Farm in Lincoln, Vermont. The bus is used for a summer camp devoted to disabled adults. The camp has wheelchair accessible treehouse built by someone affiliated with Yestermorrow (Design/Build School in Waitesfield, Vermont)

Jon Kalish
Manhattan-based radio journalist Jon Kalish has reported for NPR since 1980. Newspaper articles, radio docs, podcasts & NPR stories at kalish.nyc.
twitter: kalishjon

It's All About Building

Small Homes - the book
I've got pretty much all the pages laid out. Rick will be back from Hawaii next week and build the rest of the pages in InDesign. The book is looking better each week. Here's a little hidden waterfront cottage (under construction) on Vancouver Island, BC (the shakes for the eaves were steamed and bent).
Material continues to come in for the book (400-1200 sq. ft. homes), and we'll continue the book after its publication on theshelterblog, with a section titled "Small Homes." Ongoing small homes.

My Next Book (?)
Adventures in Building - a 70-Year Odyssey
No kidding. I started at 12 years old, helping my dad build a house on his rice farm near Colusa, California. At 18 I got into the carpenters' union in San Francisco and worked for a shipwright on the docks (SF was a port in those days!). At age 25 I started building and remodeling on a piece of land with 3 cottages in Mill Valley, California.
I never got the chance to work with a master carpenter or formally learn architecture, so I had a layman's approach. Everything was new.
Right off, I liked the smell of lumber, and was fascinated with how things went together (still am). In about 12 buildings over the course of years, I personally went through post and beam, then polyhedral (domes), and finally stud frame construction techniques.
And all along, I shot pictures of buildings, collected books, and interviewed builders about all types of buildings and materials, and so far, have produced 6 highly graphic books on building.
Having this layman's view means I can talk to inexperienced builders in understandable terms. Plus, all the travel and studying and interviews have given me a wealth of material of interest to experienced builders. We're all interested in how things are put together. That's what building is all about.

Música del día:
Etta James "Come Back Baby"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BdFcg7zkhqM

Enough! I'm heading for the beach…

Why more Americans can't afford to buy homes

"…US home prices continue to rise faster than wages, a situation that makes it increasingly difficult for those who hope to convert from shelling out monthly rent to investing in a home of their own.…"

The comments are very interesting here.

https://news.vice.com/article/why-more-americans-cant-afford-to-buy-homes

Hydrofoil Kite Racing in San Francisco Bay


 My brother Bob sent me this link, a film made by his friend Dick Ryerson. I didn't know there was such an activity.

How Do Rent-Burdened New Yorkers Cope?

"Housing is generally considered affordable if a household allots no more than 30 percent of its income to home payments and utilities. By that standard, more than half of renters in New York City are “cost-burdened” and may find it hard to pay for other necessities like food, clothing and medical care.…"
http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2016/08/23/nyregion/rent-stabilized-tenants-income-new-york.html?hp&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=story-heading&module=second-column-region&region=top-news&WT.nav=top-news&_r=0

From Canada to Mexico by Mule

Bernie Harberts was featured in our book Tiny Homes (pp. 188-89). He traveled from Canada to Mexico for 14 months in a 21-square-foot wagon pulled by a mule. Here is a letter we just received from him.

Howdy Lloyd,
Many mule miles, no letters…
You featured mule Polly and her wagon in your Tiny Homes- Simple Shelter book.

That story continues.
What I never really said much about is that I filmed that 14-month voyage across America. That voyage is now the “Lost Sea Expedition" TV series. The site and official trailer are at: http://lostseaexpedition.com
I’ve attached some photos for you. I’d love to share the story and news with your blog readers.
Hell, I know you’re busy. You write you could use a clone. No worries. I’ll write the content for you. Just tell me what would work for you (short article, picture essay, blog post, etc).
Hope you and the hummers are well. You and I have Lived for we know the Jubilation of a thawed hummer flying from our hands!

Keep groovin'
Bernie Harberts
http://lostseaexpedition.com
A Man A Mule America

Both photos from Tiny Homes: Simple Shelter

Driftwood Shacks in Oregon

I had to share some of the driftwood shacks my daughter and I found at Moolack Beach in Newport, OR recently. All of your books have brought me so much joy. Thank you!

Joyce Welsh
Portland, OR



Roadkill coyote picked up last night, skinned today.


I have quite a few skins, all from roadkill.  Foxes, bobcats, squirrels, skunks, raccoons, weasels. I like the idea of salvaging what turn out to be beautiful furs from what would otherwise rot on the side of the road. After skinning, I stretch the pelt out on a piece of plywood, fur side down, covering it with granular salt. After about a week, I remove the salt, roll it up, put it in a mailing tube, and send it to Bucks County Fur in Quakertown, Pennsylvania. They do an excellent job of tanning and in about six weeks, I get the tanned hide back via UPS.

Albert King and Stevie Ray Vaughn

Colorful Buildings in San Francisco

There seems to be an explosion of color in newly-painted houses, all over the city. Some a bit weird, like this apartment building. When I get the time (or a clone), I'd like to do a photo essay of city color.

Ohlone Tribe of Santa Cruz

This lovely painting is on the wall of the Santa Cruz Museum Of Natural History, a wonderful small museum with displays of the former inhabitants of the Monterey Bay Area, as well as local flora and fauna. It's at 1305 East Cliff Dr., Santa Cruz, CA 95062.

What a beautiful life California inhabitants had before the Europeans arrived!

Display of owls at Santa Cruz Museum of Natural History